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Bootstrapping A Security Research Project - Andrew Hay BSides Detroit 2016 (Hacking Illustrated Series InfoSec Tutorial Videos)

Bootstrapping A Security Research Project
Andrew Hay
@andrewsmhay

It has become increasingly common to see a headline in the mainstream media talking about the latest car, television, or other IoT device being hacked (hopefully by a researcher). In each report, blog, or presentation, we learn about the alarming lack of security and privacy associated with the device's hardware, communications mechanisms, software/app, and hosting infrastructure in addition to how easy it might be for an attacker to take advantage of one, or multiple, threat vectors. The truth is, anyone can perform this kind of research if given the right guidance. To many security professionals, however, the act of researching something isn’t the problem…it’s what to research, how to start, and when to stop. Academics think nothing of researching something until they feel it’s “done” (or their funding/tenure runs out). Security professionals, however, often do not have that luxury. This session will discuss how to research, well, ANYTHING. Proven methods for starting, continuing, ending, leading, and collaborating on reproducible research will be discussed - taking into account real-world constraints such as time, money, and a personal life. We will also discuss how to generate data, design your experiments, analyze your results, and present (and in some cases defend) your research to the public.

Andrew Hay is the CISO at DataGravity where he advocates for the company’s total information security needs and is responsible for the development and delivery of the company’s comprehensive information security strategy. Prior to that, Andrew was the Director of Research at OpenDNS (acquired by Cisco) and was the Director of Applied Security Research and Chief Evangelist at CloudPassage, Inc.



It has become increasingly common to see a headline in the mainstream media talking about the latest car, television, or other IoT device being hacked (hopefully by a researcher). In each report, blog, or presentation, we learn about the alarming lack of security and privacy associated with the device's hardware, communications mechanisms, software/app, and hosting infrastructure in addition to how easy it might be for an attacker to take advantage of one, or multiple, threat vectors. The truth is, anyone can perform this kind of research if given the right guidance. To many security professionals, however, the act of researching something isn’t the problem…it’s what to research, how to start, and when to stop. Academics think nothing of researching something until they feel it’s “done” (or their funding/tenure runs out). Security professionals, however, often do not have that luxury. This session will discuss how to research, well, ANYTHING. Proven methods for starting, continuing, ending, leading, and collaborating on reproducible research will be discussed - taking into account real-world constraints such as time, money, and a personal life. We will also discuss how to generate data, design your experiments, analyze your results, and present (and in some cases defend) your research to the public.

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