A Logo

Feel free to include my content in your page via my
RSS feed

Help Irongeek.com pay for
bandwidth and research equipment:

Search Irongeek.com:

Affiliates:
Irongeek Button
Social-engineer-training Button

Help Irongeek.com pay for bandwidth and research equipment:

paypalpixle


Man page of SCANPBNJ.MAN.1

SCANPBNJ.MAN.1

Section: User Contributed Perl Documentation (1p)
Updated: 2011-08-19
Index of this MAN page

Back To MAN Pages From BackTrack 5 R1 Master List  

NAME


 ScanPBNJ - a program for running Nmap scans and storing the results in 
 a PBNJ 2.0 database.  

SYNOPSIS


 scanpbnj [Options] {target specification}  

DESCRIPTION


 ScanPBNJ performs an Nmap scan and then stores the results in
 a database. The ScanPBNJ stores information about the machine that has
 been scanned. ScanPBNJ stores the IP Address, Operating System,
 Hostname and a localhost bit. The localhost bit, is simply a single
 bit which is 1 when the target machine is localhost, otherwise it is
 0. It also stores two timestamps for the machine table. The first is
 a human readable version and the second is the unix time. Both of
 these timestamp correspond to the first time that the machine was
 scanned.


 ScanPBNJ stores information about the services that are found to be
 running on the target machine. ScanPBNJ stores typical information
 about the service, by storing the port and protocol. Also, ScanPBNJ
 stores version, product and service state information about each
 service. The service state can either be up or down. Two timestamps 
 are also inserted for each instance of every service. The first is a 
 human readable version and the second is the unix time. Both of 
 these timestamp correspond to the time that the service was scanned.
 
 This tool can give an admin a clear network layout with of
 all the machines with all the services they are running.


 Apart of PBNJ 2.0 suite of tools to monitor changes on a network.  

OPTIONS


 Usage: scanpbnj [Options] {target specification}


 Target Specification:
   Can be a IP Address, hostname, network etc.
   Ex: microsoft.com, 10.0.0.0/24, 192.168.1.1, 10.0.0.0-100
   -i  --iplist <iplist>    Scan using a list of IPs from a file
   -x  --xml <xml-file>     Parse scan/info from Nmap XML file


 Scan Options:
   -a  --args <args>        Execute Nmap with args (needs quotes)
   -e  --extraargs <args>   Add args to the default args (needs quotes)
       --inter <interface>  Perform scan with non default interface
   -m  --moreports <ports>  Add ports to scan ex: 8080 or 3306,5900-5910
   -n  --nmap <path>        Path to Nmap executable 
   -p  --pingscan           Ping Target then scan the alive host(s)
       --udp                Add UDP to the scan arguments
       --rpc                Add RPC to the scan arguments
   -r  --range <range>      Ports for scan [def 1-1025]


        --diffbanner        Parse changes of the banner
        
 Config Options:
  -d    --dbconfig <config> Config for results database [def config.yaml]
        --configdir <dir>   Directory for the database config file


        --data <file>       SQLite Database override [def data.dbl]
        --dir <dir>         Directory for SQLite or CSV files [def .]


 General Options:
       --nocolors           Don't Print Colors
       --test <level>       Testing information
       --debug <level>      Debug information 
   -v  --version            Display version
   -h  --help               Display this information


 Send Comments to Joshua D. Abraham ( jabra@ccs.neu.edu )  

THINGS TO NOTE


 * ScanPBNJ requires root privileges to perform a scan.
 
 * If you do not pass a specific ports range, 1-1025 is used.


 * If there are configs in the current directory, they are used 
 instead of those in the user's config directory.
 
 * ScanPBNJ does not modify previous database entries. It simply
 inserts new information when a change is found.
 
 * One thing that should be done when performing scans is to make
 sure to use the same ports or you will get false positives.  

EXAMPLE SINGLE SCAN


 1) Scan a class B network on ports 1-9000


     sudo ./scanpbnj -r 1-9000 10.0.0.0/16
   
 2) Scan an IP Address on ports 1-9000
    
     sudo ./scanpbnj -r 1-9000 10.0.0.100
   

EXAMPLE AUTOMATED SCANS


 The following examples can be added to /etc/crontab
 
 1) Scan a Class C network every 2 hours


 30 */2 * * *   root scanpbnj 10.0.0.


 2) Scan a Class C network everyday at 2:30 


 30 2 * * *     root scanpbnj 10.0.0.  

TARGET SPECIFICATION


 The target specified is a typical method of probing the network. 
 Therefore, any of the following can be used:
 (e.g. 10.0.0.1, 10.0.0.1-254, 10.0.0.0/24 or 10.0.0.). 
 The first example is simply an IP address. The second example is 
 the scanning of a range. The third is a range in CIDR notation. 
 The fourth example is the IP with the star which specifies to scan 
 255 hosts. This is the same format that Nmap uses with the only 
 exception being the on the last octet. This is needed because it 
 needs to not interpret the star when it is being executed.


 Another option, is to use a hostname or domain name. ScanPBNJ will 
 then resolve the name to the correct IP address. If you pass a 
 debug flag with level 1 or greater, ScanPBNJ will display what IP 
 address, the hostname resolved too.  

-i <iplist> Scan using a list of IPs from a file


 The iplist option is useful when you have a specific list of IPs to
 scan. This will perform a full scan of the IPs that are specified. 
 This option is similar to using -sL with Nmap. The results of
 the scan are inserted into the database.
   

-x <xml-file> Parse scan/info from Nmap XML file


 This option is useful when you can't perform the scan yourself or 
 you don't want ScanPBNJ to perform the scan. Another situation where 
 this is useful, is if you have an XML file that was done in the past 
 and you want to extract information from it, possibly to compare 
 with what is currently being run on the target. ScanPBNJ parses the 
 Nmap XML file and extracts the information about the host(s) and 
 service(s) then inserts the results into the database.
   

SCAN OPTIONS

 

-a --args <args>


 ** NOTE ** This option needs quotes around the passed arguments


 This option will bypass the default arguments that are used in
 scanning with Nmap. This can be used to do a particular type of scan
 that is not possible by simply adding extra arguments. For example,
 if you want to only scan UDP ports and still do version
 identification and OS detection, you would do so using the following
 notation:


  sudo scapbnj -a "-A -O -sU"  localhost
   

-e --extraargs <args>


 ** NOTE ** This option needs quotes around the passed arguments


 This option will add additional arguments onto the default scan 
 arguments. This is most useful in doing scans where time optimization 
 is needed. Therefore, these arguments will be added and then used in 
 the scan.
   

--inter <intface>


 This option sets an alternative interface for performing the scan. 
 This is useful when you have multiple interfaces on a machine 
 with restrictions on which devices can access certain IP or IP ranges.
   

-m --moreports <ports>


 This options adds additional ports to the range of ports to scan.
 Individual port numbers are OK, as are ranges separated by a
 hyphen (e.g. 1-1023,5800,5900,8080). 


 For example:


  sudo scanpbnj -m 7000-7500,8080  localhost


 This scan would scan the default range as well 7000-7500 and 8080.  

-n --nmap <alternative-nmap-path>


 Use an alternative Nmap rather than Nmap located in the your path.  
 This is useful if you have multiple version of Nmap installed on
 a system or if you are testing a new version of Nmap. Remember that if
 you are using a newly compiled version of Nmap that you need to 
 export NMAPDIR to the location that Nmap was compiled in. Thus, if
 you have compiled Nmap in your homedir, use the following notation:


  export NMAPDIR=$HOME/nmap-VERSION/
 
  sudo scanpbnj -n $HOME/nmap-VERISON/ localhost   

-p Ping Target then scan the host(s) that are alive


 The ping scan is a useful method of only scanning the host that are
 responding to ICMP echo requests. This scan basically takes the host
 that respond to ICMP echo requests and then performs a scan only on
 those hosts. Therefore, no time is wasted in scanning hosts that do
 not respond. The results of the scan are then inserted into the 
 database.  

--udp Add UDP to the scan arguments


 Perform a UDP scan, in addition to the default scan. 
  
  sudo scanpbnj --udp localhost
 
 If you want to only perform a UDP scan you need to set the specific
 arguments for the scan.
 
  sudo scanpbnj -a "-vv -O -P0 1-1025 -sVU" localhost  

--rpc Add RPC to the scan arguments


 Perform a RPC scan in addition to the default scan. 
 
  sudo scanpbnj --udp localhost


 If you want to only perform a RPC scan you need to set the specific
 arguments for the scan.
 
  sudo scanpbnj -a "-vv -O -P0 1-1025 -sVR" localhost  

-r --range <ports>


 Ports for scan [default 1-1025]


 This option specifies which ports you want to scan and overrides the
 default. Individual port numbers are OK, as are ranges separated by a
 hyphen (e.g. 1-1023,5800,5900,8080 ). 


 Thus, a scan like this is ok.
 
  sudo scanpbnj -r 22,25,80,100-200  localhost 
 
 Also, if you have leave off the number after the hyphen it will scan
 all from the start port to 65535.
 
 For example:
 
  sudo scanpbnj -r 22,25- localhost   

--diffbanner


 Parse changes of the banner


 This options enables ScanPBNJ to do comparisons on the banner. The
 reason this is not on by default is that it could show changes in
 services that are not are important to the user. However, this option
 is useful to a security professional who is looking for any changes
 that occur so that they can be verified. 
   

DATABASE OPTIONS

 

-d --dbconfig <file>


 Config for results database [default config.yaml]


 This option is used to specify an alternative config.yaml file.
   

--configdir <dir>


 Directory for Config file [default . ]
 
 This option is used to specify an alternative directory for the 
 config.yaml file.
   

--data <file>


 SQLite Database override [default data.dbl ]


 This option is used when you want to change the name of the SQLite
 database file that is generated.  

--dir <dir>


 Directory for SQLite or CSV files [default . ]


 This option is used when you want the database to be generated in a
 different directory.  

GENERAL OPTIONS

 

--nocolors


 The default results from ScanPBNJ print the useful changes with colors 
 This options will simply not print the colors.
   

--test <level>


 Increases the Test level, causing ScanPBNJ to print testing information 
 about the scan in progress. Using the Test level is mostly only using 
 for testing. This will also print the debugging information so it can 
 get rather lengthy. The greater the Test level the more output will be 
 given.


 This option is also used for reporting bugs. All bug reports should
 be submitted using --test 1 and an additional report may be needed 
 depending on the issue.
   

--debug <level>


 Increases the Debug level, causing ScanPBNJ to print more information 
 about the scan in progress. Nmap scanning arguments are shown as well 
 as the ip address if you are scanning a domain name. This option is 
 used to give the user more information about what the scanner is doing. 
 The higher the debug level the more output the user will receive.  

-v --version


 Prints the ScanPBNJ version number and exits.  

-h --help


 Prints a short help screen with the command flags.  Running ScanPBNJ
 without any arguments does the same thing.  

DEFAULT SCAN


 Here are the default arguments that are used during a default scan:


 -vv -O -P0 -sSV -p 1-1025
   

FILES


 PBNJ's data files are stored in ScanPBNJ and OutputPBNJ. When either
 of these programs is run the configuration files will be generated
 for the user if they don't already exists and placed in the
 $HOME/.pbnj-2.0 directory. Again, if there is a configuration file 
 in the current directory it is used instead of the version in the
 configuration directory.


 $HOME/.pbnj-2.0/config.yaml - holds settings for connecting to
 the database which store the information from PBNJ scans.


 $HOME/.pbnj-2.0/query.yaml - lists all queries that can be used to
 retrieve information from the database. Also, includes the name and
 description for each query. This is only generated when you executed
 OutputPBNJ.


 For Windows, the pbnj-2.0 config directory is in the APPDATA
 directory, which contains both config.yaml and query.yaml. Depending
 on your environment, the APPDATA directory may be a different location
 from other environments. Therefore, when the configs are executed for
 the first time they will display the path where the configs were 
 generated.  

FEATURE REQUESTS


 Any feature requests should be reported to the online 
 feature-request-tracking system available on the web at :  
 http://sourceforge.net/tracker/?func=add&group_id=149390&atid=774489
 Before requesting a feature, please check to see if the features has 
 already been requested.    

BUG REPORTS


 Any bugs found should be reported to the online bug-tracking system
 available on the web at : 
 http://sourceforge.net/tracker/?func=add&group_id=149390&atid=774488.  
 Before reporting a bug, please check to see if the bug has already been
 reported.


 When reporting PBNJ bugs, it is important to include a reliable way to
 reproduce the bug, version number of PBNJ and Nmap, OS  
 name and version, and any relevant hardware specs. And of course, 
 patches to rectify the bug are even better.  

SUPPORTED DATABASES


 The following databases are supported:


 * SQLite [default]
 * MySQL 
 * Postgres
 * CSV   

DATABASE SCHEMA


 The following is the SQLite version of the database schema:
 
 CREATE TABLE machines (
            mid INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
            ip TEXT,
            host TEXT,
            localh INTEGER,
            os TEXT,
            machine_created TEXT,
            created_on TEXT);
 CREATE TABLE services (
            mid INTEGER,
            service TEXT,
            state TEXT,
            port INTEGER,
            protocol TEXT,
            version TEXT,
            banner TEXT,
            machine_updated TEXT,
            updated_on TEXT);  

SEE ALSO


 outputpbnj(1), genlist(1), nmap(1)  

AUTHORS


 Joshua D. Abraham ( jabra@ccs.neu.edu )  

LEGAL NOTICES


 This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
 WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
 MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU
 General Public License for more details at
 http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html, or in the COPYING file included
 with PBNJ.


 It should also be noted that PBNJ has occasionally been known to
 crash poorly written applications, TCP/IP stacks, and even operating
 systems.  While this is extremely rare, it is important to keep in
 mind.  PBNJ should never be run against mission critical systems
 unless you are prepared to suffer downtime. We acknowledge here that
 PBNJ may crash your systems or networks and we disclaim all liability
 for any damage or problems PBNJ could cause.


 

Index

NAME
SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
OPTIONS
THINGS TO NOTE
EXAMPLE SINGLE SCAN
EXAMPLE AUTOMATED SCANS
TARGET SPECIFICATION
-i <iplist> Scan using a list of IPs from a file
-x <xml-file> Parse scan/info from Nmap XML file
SCAN OPTIONS
-a --args <args>
-e --extraargs <args>
--inter <intface>
-m --moreports <ports>
-n --nmap <alternative-nmap-path>
-p Ping Target then scan the host(s) that are alive
--udp Add UDP to the scan arguments
--rpc Add RPC to the scan arguments
-r --range <ports>
--diffbanner
DATABASE OPTIONS
-d --dbconfig <file>
--configdir <dir>
--data <file>
--dir <dir>
GENERAL OPTIONS
--nocolors
--test <level>
--debug <level>
-v --version
-h --help
DEFAULT SCAN
FILES
FEATURE REQUESTS
BUG REPORTS
SUPPORTED DATABASES
DATABASE SCHEMA
SEE ALSO
AUTHORS
LEGAL NOTICES

This document was created by man2html, using the manual pages.
Time: 07:34:21 GMT, September 13, 2011

Printable version of this article

15 most recent posts on Irongeek.com:


If you would like to republish one of the articles from this site on your webpage or print journal please contact IronGeek.

Copyright 2016, IronGeek
Louisville / Kentuckiana Information Security Enthusiast